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Red Line Torpedo barb



Picture of Red Line Torpedo barb Picture of Red Line Torpedo barb
Photos © Sean Evans

Common name:Red Line Torpedo barb, Denison barb, Red Line Barb, Red Comet barb, Indian Roseline barb, "Miss Kerala"
Scientific name:Sahyadria denisonii
Synonyms:Puntius denisonii, also Barbus, Crossocheilus and Labeo denisonii (not valid)
Size:4" (10cm)
Origin:Southern India
Recommended tank size:120 x 38cm (48 x 15") or larger.
Tank setup:A spacious tank with plenty of swimming space, robust plants such as Anubias and Java Fern could be included. Keep water well oxygenated with a good flow rate.
Compatibility:Keep with other lively community species, such as other medium-sized barbs and rainbowfish.
Temperature:18-25oC (64-77oF)
Water chemistry:Fairly soft to slightly hard, around neutral (pH 6.5-7.5).
Feeding:Omnivorous, most foods accepted, so feed a varied diet. This could include frozen foods and granular/flake foods, ideally including a vegetable component such as Spirulina. Foods containing astaxanthin may help to intensify the red colouration. Soft-leaved plants may be eaten.
Sexing:No obvious differences in juveniles, but adult females have a heavier body shape and may be less colourful than males.
Breeding:Has been bred commercially, probably using hormone stimulation, but very few reports of aquarium breeding - some indication that larger groups are required and softer water may help to trigger spawning.
Comments: A very striking barb species, which is now becoming more available in the aquarium trade (partly due to captive breeding), although it is considered endangered in the wild. A second, very similar species, S. chalakkudiensis, has also been described.

 

 

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