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Breeding Corydoras panda

I originally purchased a trio of these distinctive corydoras, these turned out to be one male and two females. They were housed in a 18x12x12" tank with a sand substrate and a few plants. The tank was filtered by a small air-powered sponge filter and kept at 24oC by a 100W heater. Basic water chemistry over the period was as follows: pH 6.4-7.0 ; GH=5-7 ; KH=3 ; NO3 approx. 25ppm. Ammonia and nitrite zero whenever tested.
A number of spawnings took place at various intervals, often apparently triggered by water changes or occasionally when additional filtration was used to supplement the sponge filter (a box filter containing filter wool and carbon). Fresh (especially slightly cooler) water or an improvement in the water quality would therefore seem to be the key to inducing spawning. Three of the fry from the initial spawning rounds were kept and grew up with their parents to make the breeding group up to six (3 males and 3 females). Picture of Corydoras pandas in breeding tank
The first sign of spawning was general excitable behaviour: swimming vigorously around the tank and up and down the front glass. The males could then be observed pursuing the females. This kind of excitable behaviour often continued for some time, and was not always followed by spawning.
At intervals, a male and female could be observed locked in the classic 'T-position'. Following this the female would dash off and distribute eggs, mainly on plant leaves, but also on the tank glass. Eggs hatched after about 3 days. Only low numbers of fry survived when eggs and parents were left in the same tank, and it may be advantageous to move one or other to a separate tank to avoid the eggs/fry being eaten by the parents.

 

 

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